Sleep Well

dsc_0067

Sleep is very important when it comes to the maintenance of our mental and physical health. Although some seem to consider sleep to be a wasteful use of a third of their lives, that time is critical for many bodily processes necessary to keep you up and running well during that other 2/3 of your life. Especially if you are ill or recovering from an injury, sleep is possibly the most important part of your cure.

However, it is very common to have difficulties sleeping. Whether you wake up with a “tweak” in your neck, a headache, a limb or two that went numb, or aches and stiffness in your body, these are signs that something needs to change so your body can get the proper sleep it needs. While there is copious research and conjecture on the myriad issues surrounding sleep, the one most relevant to my line of work is posture, and hence, what you do your sleeping on. Continue reading

Advertisements

Scalene Stretch

dsc_0406

Who:

This stretch could be good for you if you often:

  • Crane your neck forward when working on a computer or something else in front of you
  • Experience stress
  • Breathe more with the upper part of your torso.
  • Hold your head at a particular angle such as when reading, talking on the phone, or working with machinery Continue reading

Bending Down

DSC_0238

As discussed in previous posts “Sitting in Chairs” and “Hamstring Stretch,” many people spend a lot of time with a rounded back. It’s hard to think of an occupation that doesn’t require continuous bending over throughout the day. Whether you sit or stand at a desk, perform physical labor, look after small children, play sports—most activities induce you to lean forward at some point in some way. While there’s nothing wrong with this, the act of bending forward or hunching over is often the cause of chronic pain for people who have been doing it the same way for a long, long time. I’m going to share a few ways to help change things up and give your sad back muscles a break. Continue reading

Sitting in Chairs

DSC_0026

Most of us “know” that we ought to sit with “good posture,” but despite the ample opportunity for practice, we tend to allow ourselves to remain in more familiar positions, like crossing our legs and various forms of slouching. A couple reasons for this can be that we actually don’t know how we ought to sit differently, or it feels like too much effort to stay in good alignment for long especially when trying to concentrate on the task before us. If these excuses hold true for you as they have for me, then hopefully you will find some enlightenment in what I have to share. Continue reading

Happy Feet, Happy Body

DSC_0291

Our feet are our foundation. Anything affecting their ability to function will have an effect higher up. So taking care of our feet is equivalent to caring for our whole body. I can summarize what I’ve learned so far about keeping feet healthy in two words: go barefoot. Continue reading

Slouching with Purpose

DSC_0321

When I decided to become a massage therapist, I envisioned that, learning about good posture and all sorts of things about keeping the body healthy, I would simply stop slouching. In the end of course, even with my new knowledge, I did not miraculously cease falling into my own habitual positional patterns. But all of us, not just enlightened massage therapists, know that slouching is bad. So why do we persist in this behavior? Continue reading

Scapula Depressions

DSC_1068

Who:

This is an exercise that is great to do if you feel that you “carry” your stress in your shoulders. If you have tension in your upper to mid back, between your shoulder blades, or you do a lot of work with your arms in front of you, such as riding a bike, chopping vegetables, typing on a computer, holding a steering wheel, carrying a backpack, and photographing cats. Continue reading